After School Movie

Our after school movie for Friday, February 15th is Enchanted!

In the fairy-tale land of Andalasia, pretty young Giselle frolics with her woodland pals, and falls in love with the handsome Prince Edward, but when Giselle arrives at the castle to marry her Prince Charming, his evil stepmother sends the princess-to-be to a place where there are `no happy ever afters’: New York City. Cynical divorce lawyer Robert comes to her rescue, but can Giselle find her way back to her true love?

The movie will start at 3:30 pm in the Kozak Room!

After School Movie

Our after school movie for Friday, February 8th is The Emperor’s New Groove!

Arrogant young Emperor Kuzco is transformed into a llama by his power-hungry advisor — the devious diva Yzma. Stranded in the jungle, Kuzco’s only chance to get back home and reclaim the high life rests with a good-hearted peasant named Pacha. Together, they must return Kuzco to the throne before Yzma tracks them down and finishes him off.

The movie will start at 3:30 pm in the Kozak Room!

After School Movie

The February 1st after school movie is PETER RABBIT!

Peter Rabbit and his three sisters — Flopsy, Mopsy and Cotton-Tail — enjoy spending their days in Mr. McGregor’s vegetable garden. When one of McGregor’s relatives suddenly moves in, he’s less than thrilled to discover a family of rabbits in his new home. A battle of wills soon breaks out as the new owner hatches scheme after scheme to get rid of Peter — a resourceful rabbit who proves to be a worthy and wily opponent.

Movie starts at 3:30 pm in the Kozak Room.

Lunch & Learn

Lunch & Learn returns in time for Black History Month! Join us in the Kozak Room for lunch and a PBS Independent Lens documentary film by Shukree Hassan Tilghman, MORE THAN A MONTH.


The young African-American filmmaker sets out on a cross-country campaign to end Black History Month. Through this thoughtful and humorous journey, he explores what the treatment of history tells us about race and equality in a “post-racial” America. 


Tilghman’s campaign to end Black History Month is a provocative gambit to open a public conversation about the idea of ethnic heritage months, and whether relegating African American history to the shortest month of the year – and separating it from American history on the whole – denigrates the role of black people and black culture throughout American history. But it is also a seeker’s journey to reconcile his own conflicting feelings about his own identity, history, and convictions.