Go Yotes!

It’s Homecoming Week at USD, which means it’s almost time for the big D-Days Parade. We’ll be there this year, so come on down and look for us this Saturday:) We’ll have some library swag, and will be walking with several other Vermillion cultural organizations. We can’t wait to see all your shiny faces!

P.S. There will be NO Story Times on Saturday morning, due to the Parade. Please share widely.

Non-Fiction Book Club

The stimulating discussion on Richard O. Prum’s The Evolution of Beauty continues Tuesday afternoon at 1:30 pm in the Small Conference Room. Holly Straub, Associate Professor of Psychology at USD, leads the way. We’ve got refreshments, too!

TGIF

It’s Friday morning!
Which means it’s time for some delicious Bean Coffee for the adults, and Parent Tot Dance (10:15 am) for the little kiddos.
This afternoon brings a movie time (with snacks!) for grade school children at 3:30.

We Read Banned Books

What’s your favorite banned book, Vermillionaires? Our Library Director, Daniel, is a big fan of the His Dark Materials series by Philip Pullman. The VPL’s Circulation Supervisor, Jeff, counts Vonnegut’s Slaughter-Five among his favorites. Susan, our Public Relations Specialist, has always been profoundly impacted by all of Toni Morrison’s works. We want to know which banned books are meaningful to you; as well as any you’re looking forward to adding to your reading list!

Don’t forget that we’re celebrating Banned Books Week with a special promotion: weigh in on our facebook page, over on our instagram or twitter pages, or even in-person at the Library Circulation Desk with your favorite banned book, and you’ll be entered into a prize drawing – just tag #vermillionpubliclibrary and #bannedbooksweek. In addition, the first 18 entrants will get a ‘Words Have Power’ button!

 

Alternate Storytimes this weekend

Miss Beth WILL NOT be at the Library for Storytimes tomorrow morning:(
Instead, she invites you to join her at the Armory for Headstart’s 40th anniversary celebration!!
Tell your friends, and help spread the word.

https://www.facebook.com/events/125681728161942/

Read a Banned Book

Throughout the country, most children are starting a new academic year. Teachers are sending out their lists of required readings, and parents are beginning to gather books. In some cases, classics like “The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn,” “The Catcher in the Rye,” and “To Kill a Mockingbird,” may not be included in curriculum or available in the school library due to challenges made by parents or administrators.

Since 1990, the American Library Association’s (ALA) Office for Intellectual Freedom (OIF) has recorded more than 10,000 book challenges, including 323 in 2016. A challenge is a formal, written complaint requesting a book be removed from library shelves or school curriculum. About half of all challenges are to material in schools or school libraries, and one in four are to material in public libraries. OIF estimates that less than one-quarter of challenges are reported and recorded.


It is thanks to the commitment of librarians, teachers, parents, and students that most challenges are unsuccessful and reading materials like “I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings,” “Slaughterhouse Five,” the Harry Potter series, and the Hunger Games series, remain available.

The most challenged and/or restricted reading materials have been books for children. However, challenges are not simply an expression of a point of view; on the contrary, they are an attempt to remove materials from public use, thereby restricting the access of others. Even if the motivation to ban or challenge a book is well intentioned, the outcome is detrimental. Censorship denies our freedom as individuals to choose and think for ourselves. For children, decisions about what books to read should be made by the people who know them best—their parents!
In support of the right to choose books freely for ourselves, the Edith B. Siegrist Public Library is celebrating Banned Books Week, along with the ALA from September 24-30th, an annual recognition of our right to access books without censorship.


Since its inception in 1982, Banned Books Week has reminded us that while not every book is intended for every reader, each of us has the right to decide for ourselves what to read, listen to or view. The Vermillion Public Library and thousands of colleges, schools, libraries and bookstores across the country will celebrate the freedom to read by participating in special events, exhibits, and read-outs that showcase books that have been banned or threatened. The VPL will be drawing attention to Banned Books Week by sponsoring ‘I Read Banned Books’ promotion throughout the week. Patrons and community members are encouraged to review the ALA’s list of commonly challenged and banned books here: http://www.ala.org/advocacy/bbooks/frequentlychallengedbooks/top10, and then either visit the Library in person, or post on the Library’s social media pages to share what banned books you’ve read, or are reading – just tag #vermillionpubliclibrary and #bannedbooksweek.
The first 18 participants will receive a ‘Words Have Power’ button, and three lucky patrons’ names will be drawn for prize packs at the end of the week.

American libraries are the cornerstones of our democracy. Libraries are for everyone, everywhere. Because libraries provide free access to a world of information, they bring opportunity to all people. Now, more than ever, celebrate the freedom to read at your library! Read an old favorite or a new banned book this week.