Winding Down

Our children’s afterschool programming, and Story Times, are now on break for the Holidays, but they’ll be back before you know it!

All children’s programs will return the week of January 8th, 2018, so keep your eyes open. In the meantime, Happy Holidays and Happy Reading:)

 

New eResource for Kids

The South Dakota State Library is happy to bring you a new talking book resource, BookFlix by Scholastic. This PreK-2 (approximate ages 0-8) resource supports beginning, ELL (English Language Learners), special needs, and struggling readers.

BookFlix is accessible inside any library or school building, or outside your library or school with your library card.

You can find BookFlix at library.sd.gov, within the Elementary School and Educators & Librarians category pages, or on the main eResources page at: http://library.sd.gov/LIB/ERD/index.aspx

BookFlix is structured with 125+ pairs of animated books, coupling classic video storybooks from Weston Woods with related talking nonfiction eBooks from Scholastic.

Benefits:

  • Build early literacy skills, vocabulary, and fluency
  • Support reading comprehension
  • Support visual and auditory learners with video adaption of fiction books
  • Form real world knowledge with digital nonfiction flipbooks
  • Differentiate between fiction and nonfiction

Features:

  • Thematic
  • Natural voice read-aloud with word highlighting
  • Author biographies and videos
  • Related web links for extended learning
  • Interactive learning games
  • Lesson plans with follow up activities
  • Spanish translated pairs
  • Streaming

Introducing Pronunciator

Recently, the South Dakota State Library introduced a new language eresource available to library patrons: Pronunciator. Pronunciator provides over 80 different language courses. There are also 50 English as a Second Language (ESL) courses. Instructional methods include oral phrases, flash cards, and learning guides. It also has ProLive, live online conversation classes led by teachers, with 250+ half-hour sessions per week in over 20 languages. Another feature of Pronunciator is the Course Designer module, which allows for the creation of private multimedia language courses in Dakota, Lakota, and over 700 other Native American languages, and for the tracking of student progress within those custom courses. This resource takes the place of the previously available Mango Languages.

Additionally, this program provides access to the additional resource ProCitizen, which is an interactive course to help prepare you for the civics, reading and writing parts of the USCIS Naturalization Test. It provides 100 instructional videos, drills and quizzes. The state library provides separate links for ProCitizen in English and Spanish. These links can be found at the South Dakota State Library website: http://library.sd.gov/LIB/ERD/pronunciator/index.aspx. A user manual for Pronunciator can be found at https://www.pronunciator.com/manual/.


Non-Fiction Book Club

The stimulating discussion on Richard O. Prum’s The Evolution of Beauty continues Tuesday afternoon at 1:30 pm in the Small Conference Room. Holly Straub, Associate Professor of Psychology at USD, leads the way. We’ve got refreshments, too!

We Read Banned Books

What’s your favorite banned book, Vermillionaires? Our Library Director, Daniel, is a big fan of the His Dark Materials series by Philip Pullman. The VPL’s Circulation Supervisor, Jeff, counts Vonnegut’s Slaughter-Five among his favorites. Susan, our Public Relations Specialist, has always been profoundly impacted by all of Toni Morrison’s works. We want to know which banned books are meaningful to you; as well as any you’re looking forward to adding to your reading list!

Don’t forget that we’re celebrating Banned Books Week with a special promotion: weigh in on our facebook page, over on our instagram or twitter pages, or even in-person at the Library Circulation Desk with your favorite banned book, and you’ll be entered into a prize drawing – just tag #vermillionpubliclibrary and #bannedbooksweek. In addition, the first 18 entrants will get a ‘Words Have Power’ button!

 

Alternate Storytimes this weekend

Miss Beth WILL NOT be at the Library for Storytimes tomorrow morning:(
Instead, she invites you to join her at the Armory for Headstart’s 40th anniversary celebration!!
Tell your friends, and help spread the word.

https://www.facebook.com/events/125681728161942/

Read a Banned Book

Throughout the country, most children are starting a new academic year. Teachers are sending out their lists of required readings, and parents are beginning to gather books. In some cases, classics like “The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn,” “The Catcher in the Rye,” and “To Kill a Mockingbird,” may not be included in curriculum or available in the school library due to challenges made by parents or administrators.

Since 1990, the American Library Association’s (ALA) Office for Intellectual Freedom (OIF) has recorded more than 10,000 book challenges, including 323 in 2016. A challenge is a formal, written complaint requesting a book be removed from library shelves or school curriculum. About half of all challenges are to material in schools or school libraries, and one in four are to material in public libraries. OIF estimates that less than one-quarter of challenges are reported and recorded.


It is thanks to the commitment of librarians, teachers, parents, and students that most challenges are unsuccessful and reading materials like “I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings,” “Slaughterhouse Five,” the Harry Potter series, and the Hunger Games series, remain available.

The most challenged and/or restricted reading materials have been books for children. However, challenges are not simply an expression of a point of view; on the contrary, they are an attempt to remove materials from public use, thereby restricting the access of others. Even if the motivation to ban or challenge a book is well intentioned, the outcome is detrimental. Censorship denies our freedom as individuals to choose and think for ourselves. For children, decisions about what books to read should be made by the people who know them best—their parents!
In support of the right to choose books freely for ourselves, the Edith B. Siegrist Public Library is celebrating Banned Books Week, along with the ALA from September 24-30th, an annual recognition of our right to access books without censorship.


Since its inception in 1982, Banned Books Week has reminded us that while not every book is intended for every reader, each of us has the right to decide for ourselves what to read, listen to or view. The Vermillion Public Library and thousands of colleges, schools, libraries and bookstores across the country will celebrate the freedom to read by participating in special events, exhibits, and read-outs that showcase books that have been banned or threatened. The VPL will be drawing attention to Banned Books Week by sponsoring ‘I Read Banned Books’ promotion throughout the week. Patrons and community members are encouraged to review the ALA’s list of commonly challenged and banned books here: http://www.ala.org/advocacy/bbooks/frequentlychallengedbooks/top10, and then either visit the Library in person, or post on the Library’s social media pages to share what banned books you’ve read, or are reading – just tag #vermillionpubliclibrary and #bannedbooksweek.
The first 18 participants will receive a ‘Words Have Power’ button, and three lucky patrons’ names will be drawn for prize packs at the end of the week.

American libraries are the cornerstones of our democracy. Libraries are for everyone, everywhere. Because libraries provide free access to a world of information, they bring opportunity to all people. Now, more than ever, celebrate the freedom to read at your library! Read an old favorite or a new banned book this week.

 

Non-Fiction Book Club

Tomorrow brings the first of two discussion sessions on our non-fiction book club this season – The Evolution of Beauty by Richard O. Prum.
The group will meet at 1 pm in the Small Conference Room.
Second meeting is scheduled for Tuesday, October 3rd at 1:30 pm.

We’re Still ‘Outside the Lines’

In recent years, libraries have changed into dynamic centers for engagement to accommodate the growing needs of their local communities. The Edith B. Siegrist Vermillion Public Library invites the residents of Clay County to experience the library in a whole new way. Come join your community outside the Library as we host some special events:

Our children’s after school programming returns for the Fall this week, with new programs in the line-up and tons of fun activities during Story Times. Art, Music and Movement Story Times are open for registration now, which can be found at vermillionpubliclibrary.org/storytime/. For school-aged children, we are extremely proud to share that we’ve expanded our afterschool programs to every day of the week! Afterschool programs are open to those aged 5 & up (except Tuesday Robotics, which is open to those in 2nd grade & up), are free of charge, and require no registration. Most programs occur twice per month, and include: Nutrition/Yoga, Minecraft, LEGO Robotics & VEX IQ Robotics, Cursive Class, Chess Club and LEGO Club. Additionally, we offer Origami Club and Art Club once per month. Every Friday we offer a free movie (with popcorn!). For the full listing, visit our children’s programming page at our website: vermillionpubliclibrary.org/kids/.

Tuesday, September 12th at 7 pm we will preview an hour of Ken Burns and Lynn Novick’s documentary series, THE VIETNAM WAR. It tells the epic story of one of the most consequential, divisive, and controversial events in American history as it has never before been told on film. The screening will be followed by a panel
discussion featuring South Dakotans who were active in protesting the War. Afterward, SDPB will be conducting video interviews with interested veterans, their family members and others who witnessed the Vietnam War as part of efforts to collect stories for historic preservation.

On Friday, September 15th at 7:30 pm the final Books & Brews of the year will feature a ‘Drive-In’ behind the library of the cult classic 80’s film, The Breakfast Club. We’ll have the movie and popcorn and a limited selection of craft beers to sample, and participants are encouraged to bring their own favorites, as well as a chair. Adults aged 21 and up only, of course.

And on Saturday, September 16th at 7:30 pm, families are invited to join us for our second annual ‘Outside the Library Drive-In Movie Night’ as we enjoy Pee Wee’s Big Adventure. Patrons of all ages are welcome to participate in viewing a family-friendly movie and munching on popcorn. Bring your own chairs and beverages.

These events – and more – are a part of Outside the Lines, a global initiative designed to reintroduce libraries to their local communities. From Sept. 10-16, 2017, organizations will host events and campaigns worldwide designed to get people thinking – and talking – about libraries in a whole new way.

Now in its fourth year, Outside the Lines takes many of the concepts, such as creativity, customer curiosity, culture, community and creative spaces, and puts them into action where they count – in our local communities. Learn more at getoutsidethelines.org.